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Sexual Harassment Training - Connecticut Training Requirements

This Sexual Harassment Compliance Training course teaches you how to recognize and understand sexual harassment so that you can help to maintain a happy work environment, free from hostility and discomfort.

Connecticut state law requires all public employers and all private employers with 50 or more employees to provide a minimum of 2-hours of sexual harassment training to all supervisors.

  • This training must be provided within 6 months of a person obtaining a supervisory position.
  • There is no requirement for retraining.

Our engaging, interactive, Connecticut Sexual Harassment Compliance Training course combines relevant videos, scenarios, and quizzes that your employees will be able to identify with and apply to their roles.

THIS MODULE COVERS...

Video: Definition of harassment. Examples of real-life stories that illustrate the impact of harassment.

Interactive Screen: What harassment includes and when harassment becomes actionable.

Scenario: Jokes based on an individual’s nationality.

Key Learning: Even if someone doesn’t intend any harm, if the target of the jokes is hurt by the jokes and this is happening on a regular basis, this could create a hostile work environment.

Scenario: Risqué emails that sometimes contain jokes on religion and sexuality.

Key Learning: Jokes that offend some colleagues could contribute to an offensive, hostile work environment.

Scenario: Friendly conversation offering dating advice.

Key Learning: Intent and perception are key to determining if a statement could be considered harassment.

Interactive Screen: Definition of sexual harassment. It doesn’t have to be sexual in nature – could include offensive remarks about a person’s sex.

Interactive Screen: What constitutes sexual harassment? Verbal harassment, nonverbal (visual) harassment, physical harassment, teasing and offhand comments.

Interactive Screen: Does it have to be sexual? Who’s impacted? What does the law say? What is a hostile environment? What is quid pro quo? Are there specific laws to protect transgender people?

Scenario: A drunken proposal while at a work conference.

Key Learning: Just because an employee is not at work, they may not engage in inappropriate conduct that would otherwise be impermissible in the workplace itself.

Scenario: Spreading rumors about a colleague’s sexuality.

Key Learning: Offensive comments about a person’s sexuality are harassment, even if the victim doesn’t hear.

Scenario: Personal history interfering in a promotion decision.

Key Learning: Must have solid reasons for reaching a hiring decision.

Scenario: Same-sex harassment – one colleague sending another flirty emails and sticky notes.

Key Learning: Conduct constitutes harassment because the conduct is unwelcome and it has unreasonably interfered with his colleague’s work.

Scenario: Inappropriate physical touching.

Key Learning: Conduct may be considered harassment if it is unwelcomed and it makes the victim uncomfortable.

Video: Define gender identity. Discrimination against an individual because that person is transgender is discrimination because of sex.

Scenario: Hiring a new team member who is in a same-sex relationship.

Key Learning: You cannot treat individuals differently because of their sexual orientation or preference.

Scenario: Whispers about gender reassignment.

Key Learning: When someone at work goes through a gender transition, it’s important to have in-person sexual harassment training with the employee’s managers and the colleagues who work directly with the transitioning employee.

Interactive Screen: Outline the impact that harassment has on the victim, the workforce, the company brand and reputation, productivity and profitability, and on management.

Scenario: Overhearing two colleagues mocking another colleague about religious dress.

Key Learning: In some cases, the perpetrators of inappropriate behavior don’t believe they’re doing anything wrong. If you feel comfortable, speak to the perpetrators and ask them to stop.

Scenario: Mocking over religious dress continues.

Key Learning: When the perpetrator doesn’t change their behavior, it’s best to report the incident before the situation escalates.

Scenario: Wider impact that discrimination has in the workplace.

Key Learning: Discrimination may cause a colleague to become withdrawn and less engaged in the workplace. This could have an adverse effect on the workforce, as it may make other colleagues uncomfortable and could cause a divide in working teams and groups.

Interactive Screen: Federal discrimination laws. Who’s protected? What’s included?

Interactive Screen: State laws. Examples: California, New York, Washington D.C., Massachusetts, New Jersey.

Interactive Learning: What do we mean by protected groups? Examples of protected groups. Types of discrimination.

Interactive Screen: Types of harassment. Quid pro quo. Hostile work environment.

Interactive Screen: Affirmative defense – under federal law, an employer can avoid liability for discrimination if it can show three things.

Scenario: Drafting a job advertisement without discriminating against any protected groups.

Key Learning: Discriminatory conduct is prohibited in all aspects of the employment process, including recruitment.

Scenario: Candidate for an interview is in a wheelchair.

Key Learning: Unless it causes an employer undue hardship, refusing to accommodate an applicant or employee with a disability is discrimination.

Scenario: Consequences of rejecting a candidate because they might become pregnant.

Key Learning: Pregnancy is a class that is protected under both federal and state law. Marital status is a class that is protected under certain state anti-discrimination laws.

Section 46a-54-200 of Connecticut state law requires all public employers and all private employers with fifty or more employees to provide a minimum of 2-hours of sexual harassment training to all supervisors that work in Connecticut. This training must be provided within 6 months of a person obtaining a supervisory position. There is no requirement for retraining. However, the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights & Opportunities encourages employers “to provide an update of legal interpretations and related developments concerning sexual harassment to supervisory personnel once every three (3) years.”

Sec. 46a-54-204.

Posting and training requirements for employers having fifty or more employees

(a) An employer having fifty (50) or more employees shall comply with the posting requirements set forth in sections 46a-54-200 through 46a-54-207, inclusive.

(b) An employer having fifty (50) or more employees must also provide two hours of training and education to all supervisory employees of employees in the State of Connecticut no later than October 1, 1993 and to all new supervisory employees of employees in the State of Connecticut within six months of their assumption of a supervisory position. Nothing in these regulations shall prohibit an employer from providing more than two hours of training and education.

(c) Such training and education shall be conducted in a classroom-like setting, using clear and understandable language and in a format that allows participants to ask questions and receive answers. Audio, video and other teaching aides may be utilized to increase comprehension or to otherwise enhance the training process.

Connecticut Legislation for Sexual Harassment Training

  • Describing all federal and state statutory provisions prohibiting sexual harassment in the work place with which the employer is required to comply, including, but not limited to, the Connecticut discriminatory employment practices statute (section 46a-60 of the Connecticut General Statutes) and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended (42 U.S.C. section 2000e, and following sections);
  • Defining sexual harassment as explicitly set forth in subdivision (8) of subsection (a) of section 46a-60 of the Connecticut General Statutes and as distinguished from other forms of illegal harassment prohibited by subsection (a) of section 46a60 of the Connecticut General Statutes and section 3 of Public Act 91-58;
  • Discussing the types of conduct that may constitute sexual harassment under the law, including the fact that the harasser or the victim of harassment may be either a man or a woman and that harassment can occur involving persons of the same or opposite sex;
  • Describing the remedies available in sexual harassment cases, including, but not limited to, cease and desist orders; hiring, promotion or reinstatement; compensatory damages and back pay;
  • Advising employees that individuals who commit acts of sexual harassment may be subject to both civil and criminal penalties; and
    Discussing strategies to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

  • Informing training participants that all complaints of sexual harassment must be taken seriously, and that once a complaint is made, supervisory employees should report it immediately to officials designated by the employer, and that the contents of the complaint are personal and confidential and are not to be disclosed except to those persons with a need to know;
  • Conducting experiential exercises such as role playing, coed group discussions and behavior modeling to facilitate understanding of what constitutes sexual harassment and how to prevent it;
  • Teaching the importance of interpersonal skills such as listening and bringing participants to understand what a person who is sexually harassed may be experiencing;
  • Advising employees of the importance of preventive strategies to avoid the negative effects sexual harassment has upon both the victim and the overall productivity of the work place due to interpersonal conflicts, poor performance, absenteeism, turnover and grievances;
  • Explaining the benefits of learning about and eliminating sexual harassment, which include a more positive work environment with greater productivity and potentially lower exposure to liability, in that employers—and supervisors personally—have been held liable when it is shown that they knew or should have known of the harassment;
  • Explaining the employers’s policy against sexual harassment, including a description of the procedures available for reporting instances of sexual harassment and the types of disciplinary actions which can and will be taken against persons who have been found to have engaged in sexual harassment; and
  • Discussing the perceptual and communication differences among all persons and, in this context, the concepts of ‘‘reasonable woman’’ and ‘‘reasonable man’’ developed in federal sexual harassment cases.
  • While not required by these regulations, the Commission encourages an employer having fifty (50) or more employees to provide an update of legal interpretations and related developments concerning sexual harassment to supervisory personnel once every three (3) years.

See how Integrity content for

Connecticut Sexual Harassment Training

maps to legislation

What you need to do

As an employee, you are responsible for meeting the requirements for sexual harassment training in Connecticut. This means providing the right training to the right people, at the right time, and making sure every employee completes the training and demonstrates understanding of the rules and regulations that apply to them.

The right training

Training should be interactive, with a focus on behavior change and real-life scenarios. Do more than tick the box! Let your employees explore the difficult situations that can arise in the modern workplace, and teach them to make value-based judgements that uphold your policies around ethics and compliance. Make sure you capture their engagement and ensure they’ve understood the core content.

The right people

Ensure you are profiling your employee base and providing a tailored learning experience based on a person’s role. Some content will apply to all employees, but (for example) managers may need content that individual contributors do not, and workers in a factory environment may experience different compliance risk situations to workers in an office. Remember, nothing kills learner engagement faster that being asked to take content that is irrelevant to your role.

The right time

As you can see in the requirements above, Connecticut laws on sexual harassment training stipulate the frequency and duration of training required. Create a program that delivers training to your workforce as part of a thoughtful campaign, delivering just enough content, just often enough, to keep the topic fresh in the employee’s mind, and meet the legal requirements.

In addition, take this excellent opportunity to strengthen the culture of compliance and ethical behavior within your organization. There are several behaviors that can be considered sexual harassment including physical and verbal activities. It is important that employees understand each of these types of behaviors and can recognize the situations where they might arise. By providing a targeted, relevant and thoughtful learning experience to your workforce, you help create an environment in which everyone can recognize what constitutes sexual harassment in the workplace.

How we can help

Smart companies create ethics-based training programs that ensure business practices that will protect the brand. Our Sexual Harassment Compliance Training course teaches you how to recognize and understand sexual harassment, so that you can help to maintain a happy work environment, free from hostility and discomfort. The engaging, interactive course for Connecticut combines relevant videos, scenarios, and quizzes that your employees will be able to identify with and apply to their roles.

Ultimately, good compliance training doesn’t just mean your employees are ticking an “I have read the policy” box. It means that they understand the correct behaviors and values expected of them, and are actively working to adhere to them, and not just within the confines of the office. They recognize that they are representing the company at all times and are upholding the values and standards of the organization both privately and publicly.

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